Entrepreneurship & Innovation II

The goal of the course is use concepts and processes introduced in Entrepreneurship & Innovation I (see separate entry for that course) from a practical perspective. Students develop business plans and/or papers on topics related to entrepreneurship & innovation for presentation to fellow students and external speakers – practitioners – from the private equity community.

Grading will be based on individual contributions to project papers. The University does not allow for group grading of projects.

Students taking this course may be future entrepreneurs themselves or keen to learn more in preparation for a career in alternative investments, corporate finance, consulting and business development.

External speakers and contributors in previous courses included: SCS, Novozymes, Norventum Capital, Northzone Ventures, IDG Ventures, Venture Cup, Connect Denmark, HSH Gudme, Accura, EcoXPac, Sapio, Lifecycle Pharma, Dentofit and Atomistix.

Entrepreneurship & Innovation I

The goal of the course is to introduce the basics of innovation and entrepreneurship from a practical perspective. The course will be highly concentrated and interactive employing external speakers, class discussions and required reading.

The course sets out some tools and processes typically used in the market for alternative investments and will prepare students for Entrepreneurship & Innovation II, in which students prepare business plans as group projects.

Grading will be based on a mid term take home paper and a final take home paper. Class participation is required.

Students taking this course may be future entrepreneurs themselves or keen to learn more in preparation for a career in alternative investments, corporate finance, consulting and business development.

External speakers and contributors in previous courses included: SCS, Novozymes, Norventum Capital, Northzone Ventures, IDG Ventures, Venture Cup, Connect Denmark, HSH Gudme, Accura, EcoXPac, Sapio, Lifecycle Pharma, Dentofit and Atomistix.

Entrepreneurship & Innovation

The focus of this course is to help you develop and systematically apply the entrepreneurial way of thinking to create opportunities and successfully bring them to market. The material in this course applies to new or innovative business ventures, whether they take place in new or existing firms, or in small or large firms. It is relevant for start-up and early stage entrepreneurs, entrepreneurial managers, and relevant stakeholders.

Entrepreneurship

Exam: Examination is conducted through submission of a written paper and a final discussion of that paper. The paper is to include an in-depth analysis of different perspectives and major research questions that are significant within entrepreneurship research. Additionally, it should include one part that deals especially with a theme in entrepreneurship, preferable (but not necessary) with relevance to the student’s own research problem. 

Entrepreneurial Project

The course is a master level course and a compulsory part of the masters program, Entrepreneurship. The course can be studied within the Business Administration and Economics programme, the International Business Administration and Economics programme and the Degree of Master of Science in Business and Economics – Programme.

The course focuses on the development of a real-life business project. Based on an action-oriented pedagogy the course is designed to let students initiate and carry out a genuine entrepreneurial project, with the possibility to form a company at the end of their master’s year. The overall objective is to provide students with actionable knowledge of how to successfully commercialize a new venture idea into a viable business. As such the course will motivate and encourage students to use their knowledge and skills in practice. The course will also enable reflections about the development of a new business concept in a team setting.

At the beginning of the course students are introduced to project management and lectures are given in how two write a business plan. After this introduction students are expected to work on their respective projects with support from their mentor and academic supervisor. The project work is carried out in teams of three students. The students working together on a project are expected to make formal presentations of their progress at three “board meetings” during the project. The final business plan is handed in at a final presentation in front of external stakeholders.

Basic ideas and concepts for the business projects are supplied by the course management. Students are encouraged to work on personal business ideas that they have come up with. However, all projects must be approved by course management.

Entrepreneurial Processes and Business Opportunities

The aim of the course is to develop knowledge and skills regarding how to initiate and start up new ventures in the region of Oresund. The course provides valuable knowledge and skills for individuals interested in starting up and working with new venture projects as well as for individuals desiring to work close to new and small ventures.

The course in subsidized by the Oresund Entrepreneurship Academy.

Entrepreneurial Growth Strategies: Issues for the Enterprise after the Start-up

Entrepreneurship is a pure form of general management. This course traverses broad areas of owner and manager concern. We begin by introducing a variety of approaches to planning in businesses that are small, but growing or attempting to grow. We view planning as an iterative process that is continually driven by a stream of strategic choices made in dynamic and imperfectly knowable market, competitive and regulatory environments. We consider intellectual property rights, opportunity assessment, public and private financing, risk analysis, venture valuation, organizational structure and practices, marketing in volatile environments, employment practices, and deal structure. This is a challenging, instructive, and valuable class for students who may consider careers in entrepreneurship. The course is designed for graduate students who contemplate starting their own business or joining a growing business after graduation.

Economic history; Economics of Innovation

This course covers several areas of innovation economics, such as their characteristics, their driving forces of innovation and how innovation affects economic growth.

The sub-themes of the course are the following:

Market structures and innovation. This part of the course describes how competitive structures and imperfect competition may induce innovation in different industries.

Continue reading Economic history; Economics of Innovation

Economic Growth, Innovation and Spatial Dynamics – Master Program

Economic growth, innovation and entrepreneurship are areas of intense research in several countries and scholars at the departments cooperating in this programme are close to the international frontier. A combination between the three areas in a master’s programme meets a need in analytical and planning work for ability to merge knowledge about economic modelling, and the role of innovation and entrepreneurship with empirical evidence about economic change across time and space. 

Economic Growth over Time and Space

Innovation and technical change is central to long term economic growth but it is treated very differently in economic theories. In a comparative manner this course presents technical change within major theoretical approaches: neoclassical growth models, endogenous growth models and evolutionary structural models. Particular attention is given to an economic historical model combined with a spatial theoretical framework of regional trajectories of growth. The model is based upon complementarities around innovations forming development blocks that are driving processes of structural change. Thus, the interplay between innovations, economic transformation and economic growth is studied with an emphasis on major carrier branches both historically and in contemporary times. Innovations are analysed in relation to variations over time in, e.g., relative prices, entrepreneurial activity, investments, labour demand and employment. It is shown how this, at an aggregate level, shows up in phases of spatial convergence and divergence, respectively.

  Continue reading Economic Growth over Time and Space

Entrepreneurial management and development university